PLEASE SEE ATTACHED DOCUMENTS FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT 

MUST BE APA FORMAT . Paper should be 4-5 double-spaced pages of content in length  ,   
Headings should be included and must conform to the content categories listed (i.e., Policy Evaluation, Policy Analysis, Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building, etc.).
TURN IT IN PERCENTAGE CANNOT EXCEED 5%PADM 610

Case Study: Planning, Negotiation, & Implementation Assignment Instructions

Overview

In this Case Study, you will apply the Statesmanship model discussed in Module 1: Week 1 to a real, specific public administration context. In other words, choose an organization that is dealing with challenges of planning and implementation of policy and programs. Next, apply the statesmanship model discussed Module 1: Week 1 to this situation. The overarching idea of statesmanship is the call for moral character. In the context of this assignment, how can this model be applied to the situation at hand?

You will apply the Statesmanship model needed to deal with challenges of planning and implementation of policy and programs. Remember to also discuss the importance of the following:
· Program Evaluations
· Policy Analysis
· Conflict resolution and consensus building
· Covenant
· Statecraft

Instructions

· Case Study scenarios must be taken from documented (published) public administration contexts; no hypotheticals are allowed. 
· Students can focus on one public administration organization or may refer to a particular situation (well-documented by the research) that public administrators faced during an actual event(s).
· All ideas shared by student should be supported with sound reason and citations from the required readings and presentations, and additional resources.
· Paper should be 4-5 double-spaced pages of content in length (this does not include title page or reference pages).
· Paper should be in current APA format.
· Headings should be included and must conform to the content categories listed (i.e., Policy Evaluation, Policy Analysis, Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building, etc.).
· 3-5 additional scholarly sources must be used. They need to be scholarly and provide relevant public administration theory and practices.
· All required reading and presentations from the assigned reading must be cited.
· Integrate biblical principles within the analysis of the paper.
· Unacceptable sources (Wikipedia, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and websites).
· Acceptable sources (scholarly articles published within the last eight years).

Note: Your assignment will be checked for originality via the Turnitin plagiarism tool.ARTICLE
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Policy Feedback and the Politics of Administration

Donald P. Moynihan
,

Joe Soss

First published: 16 April 2014

https://doi-org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1111/puar.12200

Citations:

92

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Abstract

This article surveys the policy feedback framework developed in political science and clarifies its implications for public administration. A feedback perspective encourages us to ask how policy implementation transforms the webs of political relations that constitute governance. Administrators play a key role in shaping the political conditions of bureaucratic performance and the organization of power in the broader polity. At the same time, this perspective underscores that policies are more than just objects of administrative action. Policies are political forces in their own right that can alter key components of administration, including phenomena such as organizational capacity, structures, routines, authorities, motivations and cultures. These sorts of administrative themes have received little attention in policy feedback research, just as the political effects of policies have been overlooked in public administration studies. Bridging these perspectives offers a basis for exciting new agendas and advances in public administration research.

What is the relationship between administration and politics? Few questions in the study of bureaucracy are as vexed and enduring. Many scholars sidestep it, opting to remain silent on politics and, thus, drain it from their accounts of administration. Yet it is rare today to find explicit Wilsonian claims that the two exist in separate spheres. Indeed, the dialogue between administrative and political analysis has grown decidedly richer in recent years. Scholars increasingly recognize that bureaucracies must serve many political masters at once (Derthick

1990
). Political interests design bureaucratic structures to advance political goals (Moe

1989
). Administrators are politically situated in governing networks (Lynn, Heinrich, and Hill

2001
) and are often called on to bring stakeholders together in participatory processes (Feldman and Khademian

2007
).

In this article, we aim to deepen this dialogue by introducing students of administration to the concept of policy feedback and elaborating its implications for the field. Policy is typically studied as an outcome of politics. Feedback research complements this view with its opposite, asking how “new policies create new politics” (Schattschneider

1935
). Conceiving the relationship between policy and politics as an ongoing interplay, researchers analyze how each shapes the other over time (Soss, Hacker, and Mettler

2007
).

The administrative significance of the claim that “policies shape politics” depends on how one conceives poliLiberty University

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Public Administration Review

EVIDENCE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
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Governing Small-Town America Today: The Promise and Dilemma of Dense Networks

Thomas J. Catlaw
,

Margaret Stout

First published: 14 January 2016

https://doi-org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1111/puar.12520

Citations:

7

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Abstract

This essay examines the governance of small towns in the United States. Small towns have received little attention in the public administration literature to date, yet 1 in 10 Americans still lives in one, representing roughly 75 percent of all municipalities in the United States and some 33 million people. Small towns are characterized as dense, multiplex networks that lend unique dynamics to local politics. However, they face significant social, economic, technological, and demographic trends that compromise towns’ prevailing frame of reference, fracture their networks, and alter the traditional setting of small-town governance. In the face of these issues, “thicker,” more active ways of engaging the public are needed to reknit community bonds and build civic capacity. Service learning for master of public administration students is proposed as a way to develop the emotional intelligence necessary to make sense of the complex social dynamics of small towns and to facilitate the hard work of building enabling relationships.

Small towns occupy an ambiguous place in the American political imagination. Think, for example, about the 1998 film
Pleasantville. In Pleasantville, life is orderly, predictable, and, as many of the characters confirm, downright
pleasant. Neighbors know one another and seem to treat one another with care and concern. But there is a dark underbelly. The residents are also closed-minded and unwelcoming of change and difference. In his recent study, sociologist Robert Wuthnow writes that a similar duality characterizes media coverage of small towns. On the one side, there are “wouldn’t it be nice?” nostalgia pieces, and on the other, portrayals of a “sorry remnant of an America that has been left behind … [home] of hapless, poorly educated Americans who have little better to do than watch the grass grow” (2013, xii).

In contrast to these stereotypical portrayals in film and the media, Rhonda Riherd Trautman offers an on-the-ground view of the challenges of governing in a real small town today in her article “Small-Town Policy Makers.”

1
She shows that these towns share many of the same issues as large cities: how to encourage broader public involvement, work with contentious residents and overcome factionalism, and make the most of new information technologies. Other research indicates that small towns also deal with “big city” issues such as racial polarization, drugs, poveA Biblical-Covenantal
Perspective on

Organizational Behavior &
Leadership

© Dr. Kahlib Fischer, 2010

Basic organizational behavior concepts derived from Organizational Behavior (2009), by
Robbins, Pearson Custom Publishing.

1

CONTENTS

CONTENTS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

LESSON 1: A Worldview Perspective on Organizational Behavior ………………. 5

What is a Worldview? ………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Worldview as a Home ………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

What is Your Worldview? …………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Defining the Christian Worldview ……………………………………………………………………….. 7

Application to Organizational Behavior ……………………………………………………………….. 7

The Biblical Idea of Covenant …………………………………………………………………………….. 8

Important Covenantal Terms ……………………………………………………………………………… 8

History of Covenant …………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

A Covenantal Model for Organizational Behavior ……………………………………………….. 10

OB/COVENANT MATRIX ……………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

LESSON 2: Individual Behavior in the Organization …………………………………… 13

Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13

Personality and Abilities …………………………………………………………………………………… 13

Values …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

Ethical Perspectives …………………………………………………………………………………………. 15

Outputs ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

Emotions and Moods ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Perceptions ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17

Emotional Intelligence ………………………………………………………….Strategic Planning in Public Organizations

Strategic fact. Welcome to this week’s presentation is on Strategic Planning in public organizations. For PAD M6 10, the management and public sector organizations for strategic factors that must be welcome to. This week’s presentation is on Strategic Planning in public organizations. For PAD M6 10, management and public sector organizations. For strategic factors that must be evaluated. If we’re going to look at and examine public and non-profit sector strategic planning. First is the public-private paradox. Second is the importance of being close to the center. Third is organization language and culture. And last is organization place. We’ll discuss each of those in a moment. The public-private paradox is that we know that business and government and ultimately different. But in some ways Business Administration that are the same. The paradox is at the heart of public administration. Because public administration is a discipline. We don’t measure profit like businesses do. Public administrators have to be fair and equitable to all? Where businesses don’t necessarily have to do that. We also have to be responsible to, to all the citizens and other stakeholders. We are governed by law and implemented by force. And there’s also a bit of political legitimacy and also were controlled by politics. Unlike businesses. The importance of being close to the center. The closer you are to, the more effective planning will be. In other words, planning is more. In other words, planning is more. Effective at the local level Effective at the local level than it is at the federal level. Able to steer rather than rattle, able to shape and deliver the outcomes that you’re really want. Rather than worrying about the process, which is what happens at the federal level. Or we, for reasons why it’s difficult to do this. Especially at the national and even the state level, is that at those levels, you have a hierarchy. The departments are often broken down into, into divisions and theorems. In sections. You have a fair amount of shared power among different agencies. Even within an agency, you have shared power between different divisions and even within the same division, between different bureaus in different sections. The political environment is somewhat muddied because of how we define performance and outcome. Government managers have much less autonomy with a grind our hierarchy at the state and federal level. And also it’s much more difficult to make strategic decisions. At federal level, we have the issue of federalism and separation of powers. Not only do we just have problems within an agency, but you also have different levels of government. The executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The issue of organization place. The single most important factor is location. As I said, local organizations a much more successful at applying strategic planning. Then at the state. You have to have a fair amount of autonomy Liberty University

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Public Administration Review

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND THE DISCIPLINES
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Collaborative Governance: Integrating Management, Politics, and Law

Lisa Blomgren Amsler

Abstract

Scholars have engaged in an ongoing dialogue about the relationships among management, politics, and law in public administration. Collaborative governance presents new challenges to this dynamic. While scholars have made substantial contributions to our understanding of the design and practice of collaborative governance, others suggest that we lack theory for this emerging body of research. Law is often omitted as a variable. Scholarship generally does not explicitly include collaboration as a public value. This article addresses the dialogue on management, politics, and law with regard to collaborative governance. It provides an overview of the current legal framework for collaborative governance in the United States at the federal, state, and local levels of government and identifies gaps. The institutional analysis and development framework provides a body of theory that incorporates rules and law into research design. The article concludes that future research on collaborative governance should incorporate the legal framework as an important variable and collaboration as a public value.

Practitioner Points

· In designing public engagement and collaborative processes, public managers must consider the legal framework that governs their action.
· Relevant law varies across the federal, state, and local arenas and shapes design choices.
· Collaboration itself is an important value to the public and stakeholders.
· Public managers must acquire an understanding of basic constitutional and administrative law to plan effective public engagement and collaborative governance.
· In seeking to innovate, public managers should consider what the relevant legal framework is and consult with legal counsel. However, they should also consider the likelihood that in-house counsel may be risk averse.
· When innovation presents a case of first impression, one for which there is no case law, managers should ask not whether they can innovate by using participatory and collaborative processes but how to do it consistent with their legal authority.
Public administration scholars have engaged in an ongoing dialogue about the relationships among management, politics, and law in public agencies’ work (Christensen, Goerdel, and Nicholson-Crotty

2011
; Rosenbloom

1983
,

2013
). Collaborative governance presents a new challenge for this dialogue. As an umbrella term, it describes various system designs and processes through which public agencies work together with the private sector, civil society, and the public to identify problems, issues, and potential solutions; design new policy frameworks for addressing them; implement programs; and enforce policiesoid:7293:167894478Similarity Report ID:

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Summary

PLANNING, NEGOTIATING & IMPLEMENTATION ASSIGNMENT 1

Planning, Negotiating & Implementation Assignment

Treylesia L. Alston

School of Behavioral Science, Liberty University

Author Note

Treylesia L. Alston (L32443087)

I have no known conflict of interest to disclose.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Treylesia L. Alston

Email: [email protected]

2

3

PLANNING, NEGOTIATING & IMPLEMENTATION ASSIGNMENT 2

Introduction

The responsibility of launching projects and guaranteeing their success falls on the

shoulders of public administrators. Planning and carrying out the policies and programs that have

been decided upon is an essential component of development administration. This is because it

enables the exchequer to fulfill its commitments to the populace. Public administration’s

fundamental objective is serving the public; most of the time, public administrators craft

programs and policies to address issues that are in the public’s best interest. According to Khan

(2016), public policy directs actions and provides a framework for implementing decisions and

plans. A policy contains future goals, activities, and objectives, among other things, and provides

a way ahead to reach the specified targets. The implementation strategy is one of the most

important factors that influence the success of any policy program. It is possible to establish

appropriate policies and programs; however, the key to their success lies in the stage of

execution (Hudson, Hunter, & Peckam, 2016). As a result, the purpose of this assignment is to

discuss the numerous difficulties associated with implementing policies within the context of

public administration.

The case study used

An in-depth case study has been used in order to determine the difficulties encountered

by public administrators during the process of project design and execution. The case focuses on

the facilitation of a public policy issue, the practice of methods from the textbook, and the

confrontation of challenges not covered (Maser, 2014). In this case, the evidence includes video

clips taken from broadcasts of publicly-held events. The community, the public institution

accountable for the work, anPlanning, Negotiating & Implementation Assignment 2

Planning, Negotiating & Implementation Assignment

Treylesia L. Alston
School of Behavioral Science, Liberty University

Author Note

Treylesia L. Alston (L32443087)
I have no known conflict of interest to disclose.
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Treylesia L. Alston
Email: [email protected]




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