(Callahan et al., 2012, p. 3)
A core principle of Walden University’s mission is to engage students in social change through their educational experience. If you have taken the time to explore the Walden University website on social change, you may have noted that social change can take many forms, from direct service to individuals, to working more broadly in the community, to developing programs or resources, and many other activities. The social change activities of Walden’s faculty, students, and graduates incorporate some or all of the eight features of social change explored by Callahan—scholarship, systemic thinking, reflection, practice, collaboration, advocacy, civic engagement, and human ethics. How has your thinking regarding social change, and your role as an agent of such change, evolved throughout your journey as a Walden student?2

Discussion 1: Examining Social Change
Even small acts can have large consequences, and many of these consequences are unpredictable.
(Callahan et al., 2012, p. 3)
A core principle of Walden University’s mission is to engage students in social change through their educational experience. If you have taken the time to explore the Walden University website on social change, you may have noted that social change can take many forms, from direct service to individuals, to working more broadly in the community, to developing programs or resources, and many other activities. The social change activities of Walden’s faculty, students, and graduates incorporate some or all of the eight features of social change explored by Callahan—scholarship, systemic thinking, reflection, practice, collaboration, advocacy, civic engagement, and human ethics. How has your thinking regarding social change, and your role as an agent of such change, evolved throughout your journey as a Walden student?
For this Discussion, you will analyze the features of social change as they relate to your experiences in enacting social, community, and educational change.

To prepare:

· Review the Callahan et al. (2012) paper and reflect on the eight features of social change. Which of the features are of interest to you and how might you become more involved in enacting social change in your field by highlighting those particular features?
· Review the Walden University sites regarding social change and Walden’s Global Days of Service. Think about your own past social change experiences in your community, how you currently effect social change, and how you might plan to do so in the future.
· Read the Cooper et al. (2016) case study. Consider how the leadership practices of the teachers in the case study did or did not impact change within their schools. How might you become a leader in your program, school, district, or community to enact positive educational change?
By Day 3 of Week 9

Post an explanation of the following:

· The two features of social change as described by Callahan et al. (2012) that interest you the most. Be sure to explain how those features might support your efforts in creating social change within your field.
· A past social change experience in your educational setting or community and what the web of eight features would look like for that experience. Be sure to explain why some features of social change would be higher or lower on the web.
· Your vision for enacting positive educational change in your setting and the leadership strategies and practices you will need to support your vision.
For this Discussion, and all scholarly writing in this course and throughout your program, you will be required to use APA style and provide reference citations.
By Day 7 of Week 9

Read a selection of your colleagues’ posts.

Respond to at least two colleagues who have identified a different social change activity or have rated activities differently bSkip to ContentThe teacher leadership process: Attempting change
within embedded systems

Kristy S. Cooper1
• Randi N. Stanulis1

Susan K. Brondyk2
• Erica R. Hamilton3

Michael Macaluso1
• Jessica A. Meier1

Published online: 18 November 2015

� Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Abstract This embedded case study examines the leadership practices of eleven

teacher leaders in three urban schools to identify how these teacher leaders attempt

to change the teaching practice of their colleagues while working as professional

learning community leaders and as mentors for new teachers. Using a theoretical

framework integrating complex systems theory with Kotter’s (Leading change.

Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1996) eight steps for leading organizational

change, we analyze the work and perspectives of individual teacher leaders, and we

examine how teams of teacher leaders and principals function collectively in their

efforts to lead instructional change. Our findings have implications for schools

seeking to utilize teacher leadership as a reform strategy for authentic instructional

improvement.

Keywords Complex systems theory � Instructional improvement � Organizational

change � Professional learning communities � Teacher leadership

Abbreviations
PD Professional development

PLC Professional learning community

& Kristy S. Cooper

[email protected]

1 Michigan State University College of Education, 620 Farm Lane, Room 403, East Lansing,

MI 48824, USA

2 Hope College, Holland, MI, USA

3 Grand Valley State University, 401 W. Fulton, 476C DeVos, Grand Rapids, MI 49504, USA

123

J Educ Change (2016) 17:85–113

DOI 10.1007/s10833-015-9262-4

http://crossmark.crossref.org/dialog/?doi=10.1007/s10833-015-9262-4&domain=pdf

http://crossmark.crossref.org/dialog/?doi=10.1007/s10833-015-9262-4&domain=pdf

Introduction

A persistent issue in closing the achievement gap is improving the quality of

teaching and learning in urban schools. Many argue that improving urban schools

requires increasing the instructional capacity of teachers through job-embedded

professional development (PD), where teachers engage in collaborative, ongoing

dialogue around teaching and learning (Darling-Hammond et al. 2009; Heck and

Hallinger 2009; Horn and Little 2010). Such PD often relies on teachers assuming

formal roles as ‘‘teacher leaders’’ who guide this learning (Lieberman and Friedrich

2010; Yost et al. 2009). For this leadership to lead to improved instruction, however,

teacher leaders must skillfully engage in leadership practice that effectively changes

how their colleagues teach. Yet, the process by which teacher leaders create such

change is not clear in the extant literature. Thus, we conducted yearlong embedded

case studies of eleven urban teacher leaders working in teams to improve the

instruction of their colleagues by leading teacher learning around discussion-based

teaching—that is, by trying to help their colleagues beExpanding
Our
Understanding
of Social
Change

A Report From the
Definition Task Force of the
HLC Special Emphasis
Project

Darragh Callahan, Elizabeth Wilson, Ian Birdsall,
Brooke Estabrook-Fishinghawk, Gary Carson,
Stephanie Ford, Karen Ouzts, Iris Yob

Expanding Our Understanding (July 2012) Page 2

Academic Offices
100 Washington Avenue South, Suite 900
Minneapolis, MN 55401
Phone: 1-612-338-7224 or 1-800-WALDENU (1-800-
925-3368)
Fax: 1-612-338-5092

Administrative Offices
650 S. Exeter Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Phone: 1-866-4WALDEN (1-866-492-
5336)
Fax: 1-410-843-8104

Walden University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North
Central Association, www.ncahlc.org.

Walden University practices a policy of nondiscrimination in admission to, access to, and
employment in its programs and activities. Walden does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, sex, age, religion or creed, marital status, disability, national or ethnic origin, socioeconomic
status, sexual orientation, or other legally protected status.

Walden is committed to providing barrier-free access to its educational services and makes
appropriate and reasonable accommodations when necessary. Students requesting
accommodations per the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) must contact the Office of
Disability Services at [email protected]

© 2012 Walden University, LLC

http://www.ncahlc.org/

mailto:[email protected]

Expanding Our Understanding (July 2012) Page 3

Social change is defined broadly in terms of process and product to indicate that all kinds of

social change activity are welcomed and encouraged at Walden. As faculty members, students,

and alumni have indicated, even small acts can have large consequences, and many of these

consequences are unpredictable. The charge given to the Definition Task Force was to expand

the university’s definition of social change to provide more guidance for teaching, learning, and

assessing the social change mission at Walden. To that end, the Task Force offers the following

considerations.

To bring about long-term solutions and promote lasting effects through the process of social

change, the following features may need to be considered as appropriate to the context and

purposes of each program. The features are grouped under the headings Knowledge, Skills, and

Attitudes, to encourage a holistic approach to preparing learners for social change. The

groupings, however, are defined by soft boundaries because each feature belongs primarily to

one group but may share some of the qualities of the other groups.

A. Knowledge

1. Scholarship

The scholar-practitioner model is particularly suited to social change because knowledge

applied to real-life situations is a scholar-practitioner’s goal. In the scholarly role, the

scholar-practitioner engages in active learning, critical reflection,




Why Choose Us

  • 100% non-plagiarized Papers
  • 24/7 /365 Service Available
  • Affordable Prices
  • Any Paper, Urgency, and Subject
  • Will complete your papers in 6 hours
  • On-time Delivery
  • Money-back and Privacy guarantees
  • Unlimited Amendments upon request
  • Satisfaction guarantee

How it Works

  • Click on the “Place Order” tab at the top menu or “Order Now” icon at the bottom and a new page will appear with an order form to be filled.
  • Fill in your paper’s requirements in the "PAPER DETAILS" section.
  • Fill in your paper’s academic level, deadline, and the required number of pages from the drop-down menus.
  • Click “CREATE ACCOUNT & SIGN IN” to enter your registration details and get an account with us for record-keeping and then, click on “PROCEED TO CHECKOUT” at the bottom of the page.
  • From there, the payment sections will show, follow the guided payment process and your order will be available for our writing team to work on it.