Read Eating Asian America- Chapter 1 pages 13-25
THE BOOK IS ATTACHED 
Please answer all the questions adjacent to the questions/argument types from how to write a critical analysis. (1–2-page MLA format). 
1)      the important concepts and terms of the readings
2)      the most important arguments of the readings
3)      the parts of the readings they found confusing or unclear
4)      how this reading relates to previous class readings, lectures, and discussions
You do not need to have a work cited page unless you have outside materials. Please let me know if you have questions.
Writing Expectations- See attached MLA Format: Everything You Need to Know Here (easybib.com) 
Use a white 8 ½ x 11” margin. Make 1-inch margins on the top, bottom, and sides. The first word in every paragraph should be indented one-half inch. Indent set-off or block quotations one-half inch from the left margin. Use any type of font that is easy to read, such as Times New Roman. Make sure that italics look different from the regular typeface. Use a 12-point size. Double-space, even the Works Cited page. Leave one space after periods and other punctuation marks, unless your instructor tells you to leave two spaces.Eating Asian America

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Eating Asian America

A Food Studies Reader

Edit ed by
Robert Ji-Song Ku,

Martin F. Manalansan IV,
and Anita Mannur

a
N E W Y O R K U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S S

New York and London

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS
New York and London
www.nyupress.org

© 2013 by New York University

All rights reserved

References to Internet websites (URLs) were accurate at the time of writing.
Neither the author nor New York University Press is responsible for URLs
that may have expired or changed since the manuscript was prepared.

for Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
please contact the library of congress

ISBN: 978-1-4798-1023-9 (cl)
ISBN: 978-1-4798-6925-1 (pb)

New York University Press books are printed on acid-free paper,
and their binding materials are chosen for strength and durability.
We strive to use environmentally responsible suppliers and materials
to the greatest extent possible in publishing our books.

Manufactured in the United States of America

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Also available as an ebook

www.nyupress.org

v

Contents

List of Figures and Maps vii
Acknowledgments ix

An Alimentary Introduction 1
Robert Ji-Song Ku, Martin F. Manalansan IV, and Anita Mannur

Part I: Labors of Taste
1. Cambodian Donut Shops and the Negotiation of Identity in Los Angeles 13

Erin M. Curtis
2. Tasting America: The Politics and Pleasures of School Lunch in Hawai‘i 30

Christine R. Yano (with Wanda Adams)
3. A Life Cooking for Others: The Work and Migration Experiences 53

of a Chinese Restaurant Worker in New York City, 1920–1946
Heather R. Lee

4. Learning from Los Kogi Angeles: A Taco Truck and Its City 78
Oliver Wang

5. The Significance of Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine in Postcolonial Hawai‘i 98
Samuel Hideo Yamashita

Part II: Empires of Food
6. Incarceration, Cafeteria Style: The Politics of the Mess Hall 125

in the Japanese American Incarceration
Heidi Kathleen Kim

7. As American as Jackrabbit Adobo: Cooking, Eating, and 147
Becoming Filipina/o American before World War II

Dawn Bohulano Mabalon
8. Lechon with Heinz, Lea & Perrins with Adobo: The American 177

Relationship with Filipino Food, 1898–1946
René Alexander Orquiza Jr.

9. “Oriental Cookery”: Devouring Asian and Pacific Cuisine 186
during the Cold War

Mark Padoongpatt

Contents

vi

10. Gannenshoyu or First-Year Soy Sauce? Kikkoman Soy Sauce and the 208
Corporate Forgetting of the Early Japanese American Consumer

Robert Ji-Song Ku

Part III: Fusion, Diffusion, Confusion?
11. Twenty-First-Century Food Trucks: Mobility, Social Media, 231

and Urban Hipness
Lok Siu

12. Samsa on Sheepshead Bay: Tracing Uzbek Foodprints 245
in Southern Brooklyn

Zohra Saed
13. Apple Pie and Makizushi: Japanese American Women 255

Sustaining Family and Community
Valerie J. Matsumoto

14. Giving Credit Where It Is Due: Asian American Farmers 274
and Retailers as Food SystemThe thesis
statement
is often
(but not
always) the
last
sentence of
the
introductio-
n.

The thesis
is a clear
position
that you
will support
and
develop
throughout
your paper.
This
sentence
guides
your paper.

Angeli 1

E. L. Angeli

Professor Patricia Sullivan

English 624

12 February 2012

Toward a Recovery of Nineteenth Century Farming Handbooks

While researching texts written about nineteenth century farming, I found a few

authors who published books about the literature of nineteenth century farming,

particularly agricultural journals, newspapers, pamphlets, and brochures. These authors

often placed the farming literature they were studying into an historical context by

discussing the important events in agriculture of the year in which the literature was

published (see Demaree, for example). However, while these authors discuss journals,

newspapers, pamphlets, and brochures, I could not find much discussion about another

important source of farming knowledge: farming handbooks. My goal in this paper is to

bring this source into the agricultural literature discussion by connecting three

agricultural handbooks from the nineteenth century with nineteenth century agricultural

history.

To achieve this goal, I have organized my paper into four main sections, two of

which have sub-sections. In the first section, I provide an account of three important

events in nineteenth century agricultural history: population and technological changes,

the distribution of scientific new knowledge, and farming’s influence on education. In the

second section, I discuss three nineteenth century farming handbooks in

connection with the important events described in the first section. Special

attention is paid to the role that these handbooks played in the dissemination of

agricultural knowledge (and the creation of genuinely new knowledge). I end

If your
paper is
long, you
may want
to write
about how
your paper
is
organized.
This will
help your
readers
follow
your ideas.

MLA requires
double-spacing
throughout a
document. Do
not single-
space any part
of the
document.

Page numbers
begin on page
1 and end on
the final
page. Type
your name
next to the
page number
in the header
so that it
appears on
every page.

Your name,
the
professor’s
name,
the course
number, and
the date of
the paper are
double-
spaced in 12-
point, Times
New Roman
font. Dates in
MLA are
written in this
order: day,
month, and
year. Do not
abbreviate the
month.

Titles are
centered
and written
in 12-point,
Times New
Roman
font. The
title is not
bolded,
underlined,
or
italicized.

Blue boxes contain
directions for writing
and citing in MLA
style.

Green text boxes
contain explanations
of MLA style
guidelines.

The
introduc-
tory
paragraph,
should set
the context
for the rest
of the paper.
Tell your
readers
why you
are writing
and why
your topic
is
impor




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